Investigation Launched into Countries Banning the Import of Ukrainian Products

To preserve domestic agricultural goods, Poland, Hungary, and Slovakia prohibited the import of grain and other supplies from Ukraine. As a result, Romanians began protesting, and the EU opened an investigation into the subject.

To preserve domestic agricultural goods, Poland, Hungary, and Slovakia prohibited the import of grain and other supplies from Ukraine. As a result, Romanians began protesting, and the EU opened an investigation into the subject.

Miriam Garcia Ferrer, the European Union’s agricultural and trade spokesman, reacted on Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary’s proposals to prohibit grain imports from Ukraine. Ferrer added that the European Union is opposed to unilateral moves and that trade policy is solely the responsibility of the EU. As a result, she stated that Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary’s move to prohibit Ukrainian products is unacceptable.

Protests were organized in response to logistical challenges encountered by Ukrainian food goods, which became stalled in Eastern Europe before reaching the EU, and farmers in Ukraine’s neighboring nations being pushed to decrease their prices in order to sell their products. Initially, Poland prohibited the import of Ukrainian food items until June 30, and Hungary soon followed suit. Furthermore, Slovakia backed the prohibition by claiming that hazardous chemicals were found in Ukrainian grain, posing a risk to human health.

Farmers in Romania protested in Brussels for the past week, saying, “We are also European Union farmers,” while Bulgaria, a distant neighbor of Ukraine, also stated, “We may also impose a ban to protect our farmers.”

Ukraine is one of the world’s leading grain producers and produced enough grain to feed 400 million people annually before the war.

A large portion of the Black Sea Grain Corridor is shipped worldwide via ships, while some are transported to Europe by land. Ukrainian food products left in storage facilities in Eastern European countries lower prices in the local market, and since April, the European Union has been protested due to concerns that local farmers will be harmed if prices drop further.

Local farmers in Eastern European countries protest the European Union due to concerns that they cannot compete with the price-cutting of Ukrainian food products. However, according to Politico magazine, there is a political reason behind the problem. With elections due to take place in Poland and Slovakia at the end of the year, it is not desired to lose the votes of local farmers.

At the same time, Poland’s EU Ambassador says there are 4 million tons of Ukrainian grain in their country and that time needs to be given, while the Hungarian Agriculture Minister states that the increase in Ukrainian products makes it impossible for Hungarian farmers to maintain their competitiveness. However, the Czech Agriculture Minister points out that unilateral bans will not be a solution.

Some Ukrainian officials have started negotiations with the Polish government and are calling for permission for the transit passage of products. In the meeting, which will last until the weekend, it is expected how the situation will be resolved.

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